Teaching Resources

Teaching environmental issues in your classroom is a critical component of providing your students a Meaningful Watershed Educational Experience. Discover a wealth Chesapeake Bay related books, multimedia, curriculum guides, individual lesson plans and online data sources.

Begin by choosing the criteria for your search. It is only necessary to include the criteria you wish to use to limit your search. The more specific your search the more focused and narrow the results.

If you know of a great teaching resource that is not included in the Bay Backpack please let us know by suggesting a resource.

Total Results: 62

A Scientific Cleanup Lesson

Students will learn about problems associated with litter and marine debris. They will design an experiment to investigate litter distribution, make predictions of litter distribution, and participate in a cleanup at the site. Based on the data students collect, they will make conclusions relating litter to the local ecosystem as well as human health and safety. Launch Resource

Topic(s): Wastewater and Stormwater
  • Subject(s): Language Arts, Science, Social Studies, Technology
  • Type(s): Lessons and Activities
  • Level(s): High School
  • Aligned with the following standards: Virginia
  • Rating:

Aquatic Times Lesson

Students will investigate, write and produce a newspaper that features aquatic information and issues. They will identify a diversity of issues related to aquatic organisms and habitats, and develop their own opinions concerning some issues involving aquatic life and habitats. Launch Resource

Topic(s): Bay Grasses Wetlands Rivers and Streams
  • Subject(s): Language Arts, Science
  • Type(s): Lessons and Activities
  • Level(s): Middle School
  • Rating:

As the River Flows

Students will explore the impact land use can have on rivers by assessing the impact of a variety of land use scenarios on the health of an imaginary river. They will recommend changes that reduce the impact that each land use scenario has on the river and assess the impact of land use in their schoolyard. Launch Resource

Topic(s): Agriculture Nutrients Sediments Wastewater and Stormwater Forests Urban / Suburban
  • Subject(s): Language Arts, Science, Social Studies
  • Type(s): Lessons and Activities
  • Aligned with the following standards: Virginia
  • Rating:

Bayville Lesson Plans for the Classroom

In these lesson plans, students will be introduced to the Bay's watershed as it relates to inhabiting animals and ecosystems, economics, and what people are proactively doing to reduce the amount of pollutants entering the Bay's water system. Launch Resource

Topic(s): Nutrients Wetlands Agriculture Wastewater and Stormwater Rivers and Streams
  • Subject(s): Language Arts, Science
  • Type(s): Lessons and Activities
  • Level(s): Middle School
  • Aligned with the following standards: Maryland
  • Rating:

Biofilms and Biodiversity Lesson

Students will gain an understanding of the term biodiversity by investigating some samples of biofouling communities collected from the Inner Harbor water of the Chesapeake Bay. Identify some Chesapeake Bay macroinvertebrates. Perform a biodiversity index to estimate the diversity of the biofouling community. Increase their awareness of the scientific research being performed to better understand biofilm interactions with biofouling communities. Launch Resource

Topic(s): Nutrients Toxics Sediments Wastewater and Stormwater
  • Subject(s): Mathematics, Science
  • Type(s): Lessons and Activities
  • Aligned with the following standards: Maryland
  • Rating:

Build-a-Buoy with the NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office

The NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office helps a range of students, from elementary school through high school, build buoys to introduce them to concepts behind observational platforms, to help connect them with their local ecosystem, and to help track measurements in that ecosystem. For older students, this project can enhance outdoor experiences that build upon the NOAA Chesapeake Exploration curriculum or other data-driven meaningful watershed educational experiences, and the data collected by the buoy can be uploaded to the web on sites such as National Geographic FieldScope. Students as young as kindergarteners can learn basic principles of science, technology, engineering, and math, as well as marine navigation and observation, through Build-a-Buoy projects. They love this interactive, engaging activity. This is a great program for all age levels, be sure to check it out! Launch Resource

Topic(s): Climate Water Quality Monitoring Rivers and Streams
  • Subject(s): Mathematics, Science, Technology
  • Type(s): Lessons and Activities
  • Rating:

Classifying Aquatic Debris Lesson

Students will predict the effects on animals of different kinds of aquatic debris (litter) in water. They will classify different types of debris and identify ways to reduce harmful debris. Launch Resource

Topic(s): Rivers and Streams
  • Subject(s): Science
  • Type(s): Lessons and Activities
  • Level(s): Elementary School
  • Aligned with the following standards: Virginia
  • Rating:

Comparing Water Quality Data Lesson

Students will use a computer to access water qaulity data. They will then interpret graphs of water quality data measured at different times and locations. The will use graphs and a presentation to comminicate their conclusions. Launch Resource

Topic(s): Rivers and Streams Water Quality Monitoring
  • Subject(s): Language Arts, Mathematics, Science
  • Type(s): Data, Lessons and Activities
  • Aligned with the following standards: Virginia
  • Rating:

Comparison of Different Methods for Determining Stream Flow at a Stream Site

Streams moving at a high speed can carry larger sizes of sediment and cause extreme erosion, while slow moving streams deposit sediments that can cause excessive build up. Stream flow is an important factor in the stream ecosystem and is responsible for many of the physical characteristics of a stream. Stream flow can also modify the chemical and biological aspects of a stream. Aquatic plants and animals depend upon stream flow to bring vital food and nutrients from upstream, or remove wastes downstream. For this reason, stream flow must be carefully monitored at regular intervals. There are several ways to measure the stream flow, but which way is the best? In this lesson, students will measure the stream flow using different methods and will determine the most accurate method for determining discharge, the measure of stream flow. Launch Resource

Topic(s): Sediments Rivers and Streams Geosphere Biosphere Hydrosphere
  • Subject(s): Mathematics, Science
  • Type(s):
  • Rating:

Conducting a Watershed Snapshot Lesson

Students will investigates a holistic approach to examining the water quality of a local watershed by participating in PA DEP's Watershed Snapshot. Launch Resource

Topic(s): Rivers and Streams Water Quality Monitoring
  • Subject(s): Science
  • Type(s): Lessons and Activities
  • Level(s): High School
  • Aligned with the following standards: Pennsylvania
  • Rating: