Teaching Resources

Teaching environmental issues in your classroom is a critical component of providing your students a Meaningful Watershed Educational Experience. Discover a wealth Chesapeake Bay related books, multimedia, curriculum guides, individual lesson plans and online data sources.

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Total Results: 48

Classification and Identification Lesson

During this set of activities, students explore diagrammatic and taxonomic keys and their application in the marine sciences. Following completion students will be able to: 1)Sort and classify objects and organisms based on visual attributes 2)Create their own diagrammatic key 3)Use a taxonomic key to identify objects and organisms. Launch Resource

Topic(s): Biosphere
  • Subject(s): Art, Mathematics, Science
  • Type(s): Lessons and Activities
  • Aligned with the following standards: New York
  • Rating:

Classified Information

Students learn the basic concepts of classification by sorting imaginary creatures to create an identification key in "Creature Feature", then, move on to using a key to classify and identify some of the local species of fish here at Hard Bargain Farm in "Fishin' for a Name". Recommended as a preparation or follow-up activity for Birds Up Close, Fish Adaptations, Habitat Hike, and Up A Creek courses at Hard Bargain Farm. Launch Resource

Topic(s): Fish Biosphere
  • Subject(s): Science
  • Type(s): Lessons and Activities
  • Level(s): Elementary School
  • Rating:

Comparison of Different Methods for Determining Stream Flow at a Stream Site

Streams moving at a high speed can carry larger sizes of sediment and cause extreme erosion, while slow moving streams deposit sediments that can cause excessive build up. Stream flow is an important factor in the stream ecosystem and is responsible for many of the physical characteristics of a stream. Stream flow can also modify the chemical and biological aspects of a stream. Aquatic plants and animals depend upon stream flow to bring vital food and nutrients from upstream, or remove wastes downstream. For this reason, stream flow must be carefully monitored at regular intervals. There are several ways to measure the stream flow, but which way is the best? In this lesson, students will measure the stream flow using different methods and will determine the most accurate method for determining discharge, the measure of stream flow. Launch Resource

Topic(s): Sediments Rivers and Streams Geosphere Biosphere Hydrosphere
  • Subject(s): Mathematics, Science
  • Type(s):
  • Rating:

Endangered Species Coloring Book

This picture book will introduce you to 21 endangered and threatened plants and animals found in the United States. Print the pages or the entire book and use your crayons to bring to life oceans, swamps, deserts, islands and a variety of plants and animals. A map in the corner of each page lets you learn what animals could live in your neck of the woods. If we all work together, we can continue to share the earth with these fascinating and important species and enjoy them in the wild - not only in the pages of books. Launch Resource

Topic(s): Biosphere
  • Subject(s): Art, Science
  • Type(s): Books and Publications, Lessons and Activities
  • Rating:

Environmental Analysis of Watersheds: A Unit for Grades 9-12 Environmental Studies Classes

The Watershed Module is a unique opportunity for high school students to learn science and mathematics in a context of real-life environmental issues. The lessons integrate mathematics, biology, chemistry, earth science, engineering, environmental science, computer science, and the social sciences in a series of exercises dealing with the environmental health of a watershed and its associated streams. The lessons are designed to provide an experience in evaluating impacts of human use on a watershed and its streams. The lessons range from work on the Internet using telemetry data downloaded from a satellite, to field exercises, to an environmental hearing on construction of a new sewage treatment plant. Launch Resource

Topic(s): Geosphere Biosphere Hydrosphere
  • Subject(s): Mathematics, Science, Social Studies
  • Type(s): Curriculum Guide, Lessons and Activities
  • Level(s): High School
  • Aligned with the following standards: New York
  • Rating:

Exploring Estuaries Website

This site was developed to introduce students of various ages to the ecology of estuaries, and provide teachers with estuary resources. Launch Resource

Topic(s): Biosphere Hydrosphere
  • Subject(s): Science
  • Type(s): Multimedia
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Exploring our Watershed Ecosystems Lesson

Students will develop a knowledge and understanding of how watershed systems are made up by exploring a part of the Susquehanna watershed. Launch Resource

Topic(s): Rivers and Streams Biosphere Hydrosphere
  • Subject(s): Science, Social Studies
  • Type(s): Lessons and Activities
  • Level(s): High School
  • Aligned with the following standards: Pennsylvania
  • Rating:

Exploring Our Watershed System Lesson

In this lesson students develop an of how watershed systems are made up and explore a part of the Susquehanna watershed system and map out the system. Then they will learn how water enters a watershed system and explain the concept of stream order. Launch Resource

Topic(s): Rivers and Streams Biosphere Hydrosphere Wastewater and Stormwater
  • Subject(s): Science
  • Type(s): Lessons and Activities
  • Level(s): High School
  • Aligned with the following standards: Pennsylvania
  • Rating:

Eyes on the Bay Curriculum

These resources and lesson plans were developed to support science and environmental studies educators in integrating these topics within the regular curriculum when studying Maryland's Chesapeake Bay and Coastal Bays. The goal is to integrate student learning of science concepts with the use of technology and current scientific data. In this lesson series, the Eyes on the Bay website is used to gather information and interpret data. Each lesson can be used individually or as a complete package to teach water quality concepts. Educators may adapt any of the lessons to meet their specific needs. Lessons focus on salinity, dissolved oxygen, and harmful algal blooms and are aligned to Maryland Voluntary State Curriculum (Grades 6-8 & Grades 9-12). Launch Resource

Topic(s): Biosphere Nutrients Fish Water Quality Monitoring
  • Subject(s): Science
  • Type(s): Curriculum Guide, Data
  • Aligned with the following standards: Maryland
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Fit It! Natural Resource Restoration Lesson

Students will learn at least three examples of natural events and human activities that injure coastal resources. Then describe at least three cases in which injured coastal resources have been restored by human activity. They will describe at least three ways that people have been able to contribute to coastal resource restoration. Launch Resource

Topic(s): Population Biosphere
  • Subject(s): Science
  • Type(s): Lessons and Activities
  • Level(s): High School
  • Rating: